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D+BATE – PlayStation Move


13:0527/05/2010Posted by D+PAD Staff6 Comments

Will PlayStation Move mark the biggest advancement in gaming inputs since the invention of the joypad?

With E3 2010 fast approaching, we thought it would be a good time to look at ‘the next big things’ that lie around the corner. So, with that in mind, some of the D+PAD team got together to ponder the PlayStation Move, and what impact it could have on videogaming.

So, here’s what we thought when presented with the following question:-

‘Will PlayStation Move mark the biggest advancement in gaming inputs since the invention of the joypad?’

Chris Morell: “There’s no doubt about it – motion control is here to stay; but while Nintendo’s machine has worked wonders to usher in the era of ‘waggle- waggle-chop-chop’ gaming, there’s still a fair way to go before it becomes fully accepted by the core gamer. In this sense, Sony hopes Playstation Move will be what the rest of us have been waiting for. Technology alone isn’t going to sway the masses however, so the success or failure of this new system is likely to rest squarely on the company’s ability to persuade third-party developers into considering it for integration.

There’s still a very real danger that Move will fall by the wayside if it releases only to a series of mini-games ripped wholesale from the Wii, though we would be foolish not to expect a few of those. Instead, big-name developers will need to lend their support in a manner that will allow the ‘hardcore’ to make a comfortable transition away from the joypad, which is something that may prove to be all-too difficult. Sony has an uphill struggle with this one – and then of course there’s the small issue of Natal…”

Simeon Paskell: “Motion controls are at a crossroads – the Wiimote has opened the door, but left many pondering ‘Well that’s great and all…but what now?’ The early promotional videos for the Wiimote made me think ‘Wow – this is going to be amazing’. When I finally got my hands on a Wii, I thought – ‘Wow – this is amazing’, but then over time, it dawned on me that I had been duped. Yes, the Wiimote is a lot of fun to use – and its importance to the industry should never be underestimated – but I don’t think that it has genuinely delivered on the promises made by Nintendo in those early days.

It is for this reason that I’m excited about PlayStation Move. While its design has obviously been influenced by the Wiimote, it looks like it could actually deliver on Nintendo’s promises and offer the degree of nuance that is needed for more intricate game design. It will hopefully also get rid of the notion that ‘motion controls = mindless waggle’ (please note, this isn’t something that I agree with).

As for it being most important controller since the joypad…I think that’s probably a little strong, but it could be one of the most important things to happen to motion sensing since the Wiimote – and that would be quite an impressive feat in itself. That is, of course, if we haven’t just been duped by Sony’s PR machine!”

Graham Naunton: “At the risk of sounding like a shrivelled, smelling-of-mothballs traditionalist, I believe that the likes of Sony and Microsoft should just leave the gigantic, diamond-horned white waggling behemoth that is Nintendo well alone, lest it be laughed out of it’s bright lit cave with their tails betweens their legs and their wallets feeling a metric ton lighter.

I say Nintendo, because motion control is theirs. They haven’t borrowed it, outright stole it, were “inspired” by it – it simply belongs to them, now. Ok, so you might have played Time Crisis, Samba di Amigo or even used the Dreamcast fishing rod before sampling the Wii for the first time, but the way that Nintendo has skilfully marketed a decidedly risky, potential flash-in-the-pan control method into a piece of technology that is now arguably forever engrained into popular culture is nothing short of genius. Books will be wrote about this generation for years to come, so whilst I’m on the subject of looking ahead, is the Wii simply a precursor to more sophisticated, mature, inspiring games? Is Move and Natal the main event to the Wii’s support act?

No, because there’s something else that belongs to the Wii – the market. As in, my sister’s boyfriend’s parents, who owns twice as many Remotes and four times as many games as I do. Do Sony and Microsoft think that they can just saunter up to my sister’s boyfriend’s parents and slide another console under the TV? I do not think so.”

Zoheir Beig: “Though I look at Sony and Microsoft’s fumblings with motion-control as a little desperate, there is one area in which the introduction of Natal and – to a greater extent – Move could be a good thing for the industry, and that’s in the area of third-parties. Earlier Chris mentioned that “there’s still a fair way to go before (the Wii) becomes fully accepted by the core gamer”, which if true is a damning indictment of today’s gaming audience and their narrow-minded approach to the medium. The Wii has been host to some of the richest, most distinctive games this generation (No More Heroes, MadWorld, A Boy and his Blob etc), but their sales have been so disappointing that it makes me wonder whether these so-called “core gamers” – probably the same sort of people who complain that their favourite game deserved a 9 instead of an 8 – are so entrenched in their prejudices that they will ignore a console that has now, for better or worse, dominated and controlled the trajectory of this generation. It’s a self-fulfilling prophecy: if the only games sold on the Wii, aside from Nintendo’s own masterworks, are lowest-common denominator mini-game compilations or Just Dance then the Wii’s image as a place where shovelware is king appears to be fulfilled.

The biggest advancement since the traditional joypad was the Wii. No other company had the bravery to build their new hardware around such a radical concept. I think Move will be more important for helping these maligned third-party developers sell their games to an audience who could now potentially accept the introduction of motion-control, because suddenly here it is on a console that isn’t supposedly dominated by people who aren’t traditional gamers. Killzone 3, in HD, and with Move controls would admittedly be ace, but let’s not get carried away here.”

So what do you think? Has PlayStation Move set fire to your imagination, or will you be giving it a miss?

Let us know below!

Next week….NATAL….

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6 Comments »

  • truthhurts said:

    Hate to break it to sony, but theres something out there called the wiimote, and its been out there for a while. So calling this biggest advancement in gaming inputs since the invention of the joypad, is overrated.

  • MoveOn said:

    all I see is a wiimote wannabe and I have a feeling when the casual person is standing at the checkout they will be thinking the same thing and then happily pick up a Wii, just like their neighbors.

    The jury is out on Natal but one advantage it has is it does appear at least to casuals that it is the “next big thing” or the “next step” in motion.

    Just in my own social circles the Wii owners are wondering what this Natal thing is about and that is good for MS.

    I wish both of them luck and I hope that they can bring some non-casual experiences to these devices.

  • primicus said:

    People here are missing the point. Move is what the Wiimote originally promised, its the wii that works. It is a good point to mention that the general public will need to be convinced of this. What with the Ps3’s higher price and the fact its an additional peripheral. Core gamers will see it for what its worth(hopefully good)

  • CaptNewTech said:

    “Hate to break it to sony, but theres something out there called the n64’s analog remote, and its been out there for a while. So calling this dual shock the biggest advancement in gaming inputs since the invention of the joypad, is overrated.”

    “All I see is a n64 analog remote wannabe and I have a feeling when the casual person is standing at the checkout they will be thinking the same thing and then happily pick up a N64, just like their neighbors.

    The jury is out on dual analogs but one advantage it has is it does appear at least to casuals that it is the “next big thing” or the “next step” in game control.

    Just in my own social circles the n64 owners are wondering what this playstation thing is about and that is good for Sony.

    I wish both of them luck and I hope that they can bring some non-casual experiences to these devices.

  • Rahab said:

    RE: truthhurts, the difference is the MOVE works. I have a Wii and I’m always happy when a game supports Classic Control because 9 times out of 10, the games that have motion control just do not do the job.

    Don’t get me wrong, there are more than a few games out there that do an ok job of it (Zack & Wiki), but most are that “waggl-waggle-chop-chop” Mr. Morell nailed perfectly. Don’t kid yourself, the Wii is anything but perfect and at least the Move is capitalizing on those downfalls to make something that pushes forward.

    (yes…I was at a demo event for Move so I know what I’m talking about. I went in a skeptic, left a believer).

  • Paranoimia said:

    I’m not generally interested in motion control, but Move definitely has me interested. Whether I buy it or not depends on the games they make available. Sony are supposedly not going to settle for straight Wii ports, so that’s a good thing.

    As I see it, Move is the best on offer of the three systems. It’s a Wiimote on steroids, and above all, it’s accurate and doesn’t lag.

    If reports are true, Natal is little more than an EyeToy. They’ve had to remove a lot from it compared to the original hardware, yet it’s still to cost more than the Move; it’s inaccurate, lags noticeably, is extremely limited by its very nature (lack of buttons), and according to at least 2 developers, still isn’t working as it should. And to top it off, as the recent video for Kung-Fu Live shows, full-motion body control is already being done on PS3 with the PS Eye.

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